ERECHTHEION, TEMPLE OF ATHENA & POSEIDON - Athens

Updated: Oct 19, 2021

Erechtheion, Temple of Athena & Poseidon - Athens

After 2,500 years on the Erechteion in 2008, five of the six Caryatids were transferred to their current home in the Acropolis Museum of Athens.


By Alexios Demos on April 20, 2020
Caryatids Porch Erechtheion Temple at Acropolis Athens Sepia
Caryatid Porch - The Erectheion | Athens Acropolis | Athens | © Copyright 2021 Alexios Demos

Indicative Information | Tickets Full: €20, Reduced: €10 | Visiting Times Summer: 08:00 -18:30 | Athens, Greece (At the Acropolis of Athens near the Parthenon) | More info call +302109238747 / 2109238747

I present to you the timeless beauty of the Caryatids that function as female architectural columns with resplendent sculptural detail especially in their hair on the south porch of the Erechtheion (406 BC) a deeply sacred temple on the Acropolis of Athens dedicated to both the goddess Athena & the god Poseidon.

“ In Athenian folklore, the Caryatids lament every night for their sister awaiting the day they will be reunited!”

Potentially / most likely they were sculpted by Alcamenes a Greek sculptor from the island of Lemnos and pupil of the “godlike” in skill sculptor Phidias (5th c. BC).


Erechtheion, Temple of Athena - Athens

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I present to you the timeless beauty of the Caryatids that function as female architectural columns with resplendent sculptural detail especially in their hair on the south porch of the Erechtheion (406 BC) a deeply sacred temple on the Acropolis of Athens dedicated to both the goddess Athena & the god Poseidon. After 2,500 years on the Erechteion in 2008, five of the six Caryatids were transferred to their current home in the Acropolis Museum of Athens. The remaining “sister” stolen by Thomas Bruce, Lord of Elgin (1766-1841 AD) still resides at the British Museum in London since 1816. In Athenian folklore, the Caryatids lament every night for their sister awaiting the day they will be reunited! Potentially / most likely they were sculpted by Alcamenes a Greek sculptor from the island of Lemnos and pupil of the “godlike” in skill sculptor Phidias (5th c. BC).

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Ironically as legend states the Caryatids were not actually from Athens but rather from the Peloponnese and specifically a town outside Sparta called Caryae. Symbolically their use as support columns represents their punishment by Athens as they committed treason and sided with the Persian Empire in the Greco – Persian wars!

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I don’t even want to imagine all of the archaeologists at the edge of their seats for the 70-minute journey when the Caryatids relocation that was conducted using three tower cranes transferring metal boxes with the Caryatids inside between the old and the new acropolis museum took place in late 2007 early 2008! When you visit pay attention to the backside of the Caryatids as the way their hair is “styled” varies significantly from column to column (the sculptural marble craftsmanship displaying fluid excellence remains the same nonetheless)!

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Date of Visit: Nov 19, 2019

Weather Conditions: Afternoon visit around 17:00 (Winter Sunset) - It was very humid, and it rained shortly afterward.

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